Decision Sciences Research Forum

Every spring, the Decision Sciences Collaborative hosts a Research Forum in which the awardees of Decision Sciences' Small Research Grants for Faculty and Students present their research.

Spring 2018

On Friday, February 23, 2018 from 3-5:30pm in Psychology Room 035, we will hold our annual research forum. We'll have talks and posters from faculty as well as students who have been funded by our collaborative. Appetizers will be available during the poster session from 4:15-5:30pm in the Psychology lobby.

Abstracts from the forum are available here.

Download a copy of the final agenda: Research Forum Agenda 2018.docx

Spring 2017

On Friday, March 31, 2017 from 3-5:30pm in Psychology Room 035, we will hold our annual research forum. We'll have talks and posters from faculty as well as students who have been funded by our collaborative. Appetizers will be available during the poster session from 4-5:30pm in the Psychology lobby.

Abstracts and photos from the forum are available here.

Download a copy of the final agenda: Research Forum final agenda 2017.docx

Spring 2016

On Friday, March 25, 2016 from 3-5:30pm in Psychology Room 035, we will hold our annual research forum. We'll have talks and posters from faculty as well as students who have been funded by our collaborative. Appetizers will be available during the poster session from 4-5:30pm in the Psychology lobby.

Abstracts are available here.

Spring 2015

On Friday, April 17, 2015 from 3-5:30pm in Psychology Room 035, we will hold our annual research forum. We'll have talks and posters from faculty as well as students who have been funded by our collaborative. Appetizers will be available during the poster session.

Abstracts are available here.

Spring 2014

Opening remarks will be offered by Gifford Weary, dean, social and behavioral sciences and professor of psychology. Our keynote speaker will be Laura Scherer from the University of Missouri. The title of her talk is "Confidence in deliberation: The consequences of deliberative and intuitive thought modes on decision quality and satisfaction."

Scherer's research is primarily concerned with when, how and to what advantage people use spontaneous associations and “gut feelings” in judgment. In her work, Scherer addresses how spontaneous feelings, versus deliberative reasoning, can influence life-altering medical decisions. This latter work aims to inform the development of patient decision support tools.

Graduate student talk titles are available here.

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